About Pwllheli

Pwllheli is a vibrant seaside town located on the south facing coastline of the Llŷn Peninsula, North Wales.

It sits neatly between two of Wales’s most stunning natural attractions.

To the east, lies the Snowdonia National Park with some of the finest mountain peaks in the UK, combining tough terrain with un-rivalled views stretching many miles across the region.
To the west, you’ll discover the undoubted ‘Outstanding Natural Beauty‘ of the Llŷn Peninsula, boasting some of the finest natural, rugged coastline in Wales, that also forms part of the Wales Coastal Path.

On the northern edge of the spectacular Cardigan bay with two south facing beaches and access to a sheltered bay, Pwllheli has earned international recognition for watersports, most notably sailing.

‘A popular tourist destination’

Pwllheli enjoys a steady flow of visitors all year round. Like most tourist areas, Pwllheli is busiest during the school summer holidays when the hotels, bed and breakfasts and holiday cottages are at full capacity, the many nearby campsites are full of life and the marina is buzzing with international events.

However, the population of just over 4,000 keeps Pwllheli fairly active all year round.

Pwllheli has a long association with the maritime industry. With it being home to a world class marina and the national sailing academy, Plas Heli, the industry still plays a major part in today’s daily life. But there’s much more on offer here at Pwllheli. The town itself also holds a weekly market (every Wednesday), which is the largest outdoor market held in North Wales. The high street is full of activity with an array of independent retailers, where you can pick up locally produced goods and gifts. You can also pick up a decent cup of tea or coffee at one of its many cafes and bistros or why not try some locally produced ice cream.

If it’s a night out you’re after, then you won’t be disappointed. The town boasts a number of pubs and restaurants. You can also check out the local nightclub, where you can dance away to the early hours.

pwllheli_pengarn

Language and Culture

Pwllheli has a long association with the maritime industry. With it being home to a world class marina and the national sailing academy, Plas Heli, the industry still plays a major part in today’s daily life. But there’s much more on offer here at Pwllheli. The town itself also holds a weekly market (every Wednesday), which is the largest outdoor market in North Wales. The high street is full of life with an array of independent retailers, where you can pick up locally produced goods and gifts. You can also pick up a decent cup of coffee at one of its many cafes and bistros or locally produced ice cream.

If it’s a night out you’re after, then you won’t be disappointed. The town boasts a number of pubs and restaurants. You can also check out the local nightclub, where you can dance to the early hours.

Here at Pwllheli and the Llŷn Peninsula you will get to experience the Welsh culture at its finest, where the Welsh language (Cymraeg) is still regarded as the first spoken language of the majority of its people.

Did you know –  Welsh is one of the oldest languages in Europe that can be traced back possibly over 4,000 years.

Here are some useful phrases that you may wish to try.

Good morning Bore da (Bor-eh Dah)
Good afternoon Prynhawn da (Prihnown Dah)
Good night Nos da (Nohs Dah)
How are you? Sut mae (Sit Mae)
Goodbye Hwyl fawr (Hooil vower)
Thank you Diolch (Dee-ol[ch])

Weather and Climate

Pwllheli enjoys its fair share of fine weather, mainly due to the location of the Llŷn Peninsula. It is widely thought that the area experiences its very own micro climate, but it’s fair to say that the recent unpredictability of the British weather leaves a lot to be desired.

Where is Pwllheli?

Pwllheli

Getting here.

You can reach Pwllheli by:-

by Train – Pwllheli is the last stop on the Cambrian Line. Trains travel here from Machynlleth and then further afield to Aberystwyth and through to Shrewsbury. The Cambrian line is regarded as one of the most scenic railway lines in the UK.

by Road – Pwllheli can be reached by road from two directions. The A497 from Porthmadog joins the A487 and then the A470, which is the main trunk road to South Wales and also the midlands of England. The A499 from Caernarfon is the final link across North Wales which links to the A55 North Wales Expressway.

by Bus – You can reach Pwllheli by bus. Buses operate from the Bangor and Dolgellau direction and connections can be made from further afield. Buses run frequently between Caernarfon and Porthmadog and there many routes across to the Llyn Peninsual towards Abersoch, Aberdaron and Nefyn.

by Sea – If you’re a boat owner, you can get here by sea and berth at our world class marina. Visiting vessels are always welcome but it’s best to check with the marina prior to your visit.